The Dark Side of Time

Is space-time fragmented, segmented into quantized bits of information, or causal sets?

Or is space-time smooth and continuous, with curves, bends, and warps; just as Einstein had predicted?

Is what we call space-time even part of objective reality or is it just a mathematical construct that appeals to our perceptions?

The answer could be all of the above depending on our frame of reference. When we apply Temporal Mechanics to Physics, it appears that there are underlying aspects to Relativity that subtly show up in Quantum Mechanics as extra dimensions of time.

Obsolete points-of-view regarding the nature of time and relative frames of reference may be at the center of the mismatch between Quantum Mechanics and General Relativity.

Most physics theories tend to have a unique premise in common: one time dimension. In fact, there is a growing consensus that time is just an illusion.

Yet, applying extra dimensions to time can successfully modify modern physics without violating the conservation laws long held to be true. Modern notions of quantum gravity and curved space-time can successfully be replaced with an infinitude of relative frames of reference, progressing and regressing though infinite series of relations, which imply the existence of multidimensional time.

Weight! Just a Moment… Mass as a Composite of Time

A Brief look into the history of the development of the concepts of Space, Time and how they relate to Mass. Starting in 1715 working up into today, we move from conventional into unconventional examining multidimensional time and its possible relationship with mass.

This philosophy video attempts to answer the age old question:

“What is mass?!”

Could mass simply be a composition of time? Is mass composed of temporal coordinates?

It’s About Time! The Case for Temporal Dynamics

Gavin Wince explores conventional concepts concerning the meaning of time held by some of the world’s top physicists.

Does it make sense to restrict something as elusive as time to having only one dimension?

Is there room in conventional thinking for extra dimensions of time?